Scientists have discovered the world’s oldest water (as of now) in a mine in Canada. It was nearly 3 kilometers deep and tests revealed that it is at least two billion years old. This prehistoric water gives scientists clues not only about life on earth at that time, but also about the locations of water on other planets, including Saturn and Jupiter.

BBC discusses the composition of the water and how to apply the findings practically:

Tests have revealed that it is at least two billion years old.

It provides scientists with a unique insight into the history of our planet, and gives a glimpse at the life that was present at this time.

The researchers say that studying watery sites like this on Earth could give them clues about where life might reside elsewhere in the Solar System, such as the oceans on the icy moons of Saturn and Jupiter.

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